HIV and AIDS Spreading amongst World Populations – Virus Example

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"HIV and AIDS Spreading amongst World Populations"  is an engrossing example of a paper on the virus. Whenever news of the HIV/AIDS spreading is broadcast in the news, the first reaction many people have to that news is a wonderment. Their wonderment comes from living in a society and world where people communicate on the internet with the push of a button, and in the face of medical advances in cloning and understanding the human anatomy.   How, they ask themselves, can an incurable STD (sexually transmitted disease) continue to spread at a rate that essentially marks large sections of world populations for extinction?   One answer to consider comes from the social composition of world populations.   In a recent survey, very simple and personal information provided by those surveyed helps shed light on how, in the face of all things modern, something preventable like HIV/AIDS continues to spread amongst world populations. The Survey A recent survey of 30 students, in which sixty-six percent of the participants were female and thirty-three percent were male; the question of at what age did the participants begin having conversations with their own parents about sex.   The exact question was put to the participants in this way: Did anyone in your family/community talk to you about sex when you were a teenager?   The response to the question was a simple Yes or No response.   Sixty-three percent of the students responded Yes, they did have conversations about sex with parents or some other person who might have informed them on the subject of sex.   Thirty-six percent of the participants responded, No, indicating that they did not have conversations about sex as teenagers with either their parents or some other person who might have been responsible for informing them on the subject of sex. Thirty-six percent of the participants indicating that they were not informed on sex through discussions with their family members or other persons in their communities who might have been responsible for educating them on the topic at first might seem to be a very high percentage of uninformed participants.   However, that high percentage of uninformed participants is better understood in light of other statistics about the participants.   The first statistics, indicating that sixty-six percent of the participants were female and thirty-three percent of them were male; might cause the casual observer to conclude that none of the men, at thirty-three percent, and a small percentage of the women, out of the sixty-six percent, were poorly educated on sex as teenagers.   However, there are even better-clarifying statistics here.   Of the 30 participants, forty-six percent were Protestant, sixteen percent were Catholic, less than one percent generally described themselves as Christian, twenty percent were Muslim, and less than one percent were “ other” than the aforementioned religious affiliations, and sixteen percent were Catholic.   The total sum of Muslims, generally “ Christian” , and those of “ other” affiliation, comprises thirty-six percent of the population, and the exact percentage of those individuals claiming not to have had discussions on sex as teenagers.   This would lead the researcher to conclude that the “ western” religions, Protestant and Catholic, are more educated on sex as teenagers. Those statistics are revealing, because the spread of HIV/AIDS, today, is most rapidly spreading in third world nations that are largely Muslim in religious affiliation, as are the African nations where the spread and death rate from HIV/AIDS has been reported to be higher than elsewhere in the world.   Additionally, thirty-six percent of the participants in the study were of other than white British.   Those participants who were other than white British were less than one percent African, thirteen percent Indian, and less than one percent Pakistani.   Therefore, because these three sections make up the exact percentage of those who did not receive sex education as teenagers, we can conclude that these non-Protestant, other than white British participants, whose cultural roots are other than white British; did not receive education on sex as a teenager.   That these countries, Africa (as a continent), India, and Pakistan are third world nations where the rate of HIV/AIDS deaths are reported to be high and increasing; then there is a direct correlation to the lack of sex education as teenagers and the spread of HIV/AIDS. Interesting, too, are the statistics that are revealed by the question: Who do you think should be responsible for providing/giving sex education?   The response of sixty-six percent of the participants indicated that parents or schools should be responsible for educating teens on sex; which coincides with the total of female participants in the study.   This is consistent with the statistics that show thirty-six percent of the participants believe that sex education should be instructed between the ages of nine and eleven years old, and thirty percent believe that sex education should commence at ages eleven to thirteen; while the remaining ten percent believe that sex education should begin at age sixteen, or above.   What the study reveals is that while one hundred percent of the participants were aware of HIV/AIDS, and fifty percent of the participants were between 40 to 45 years of age; twenty-six were between 35 to 40 years of age, and twenty-three percent were between 25 to 30 years of age; that the cultural background of the participants would have a greater impact on the student’ s who might not be informed on the subject of sex as teenagers, and who would, therefore, be representative of populations more likely to experience a high rate of HIV/AIDS infection, and continued spread of the disease. This suggests that cultural background and religious affiliation, more than age, is perhaps contributing to the lack of understanding and education about sex amongst teenagers – at a vital age at which to impact people on the subject of STDs.   That if world society wants to bring about a significant halt to the spread of HIV/AIDS, then it is imperative that education begins in the pre-teen or teen years, and that religious leaders acknowledge and support their communities in the need to educate pre-teens and teenagers on the subject of sex, and to learn about safe sex at the age when people are most likely to become sexually active. Conclusion While the participants’ own religious and cultural backgrounds have probably been affected by the extent to which they were educated as teenagers on sex; one hundred percent of the participants were aware of HIV/AIDS, and, as such, no doubt that the disease is sexually transmitted and, at this point in time, incurable.   Regardless of their own experiences, the majority of the participants, although they do not necessarily agree at what age sex education should begin; agree that pre-teen or teenage sex education should happen.   This indicates a universal goal of halting the spread of HIV/AIDS.

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