Health Promotion - No Smoking Day Campaign – Social&Family Issues Example

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"Health Promotion - No Smoking Day Campaign"  is an outstanding example of a paper on social and family issues. Normally, what is known by the public about health-related matters is inadequate. Many think that because the public is fairly educated, it is informed about health-related issues but this is not the case. This is the reason behind the usefulness of health campaigns and health promotion activities. In most cases, the health promotion activities target both the individual and the society in general, as a way of promoting public health. In most cases, health campaigns follow certain theoretical frameworks as shall be seen in the ensuing discourse and light of the chosen three campaign programs- anti-smoking campaigns, cervical screening awareness, and the stop AIDS awareness. Brief Description of the Campaigns and How and Why Models and Theories of Health Promotion Have Been Used The No Smoking Day campaign                       The anti-smoking campaign is properly known as the No Smoking Day and it operates under the aegis of the British Heart Foundation.

The No Smoking Day has been in operation since 1983. The purpose of No Smoking Day is to make a positive appeal to all types of smokers regardless of class, sex, age, and religion.

Smokers are informed about the existence of help in the event that they come to think of quitting smoking. Smokers are also informed of the many benefits that come with not smoking.   The No Smoking Day campaign also seeks to capture media attention and in this light, it enjoys a lot of support from print and electronic media.                       The No Smoking Day campaign also informs the public of what it does not do, in the bid to fight to smoke.

Particularly, No Smoking Day campaign does not: force smokers to quit smoking; harass smokers, or leave quitters high-and-dry. The No Smoking Day campaign is centered on thousands of local organizers in the United Kingdom. Through these organizers’ efforts, campaigns are redesigned and re-launched with fresh campaign themes annually. The organizers create posters, leaflets, and relevant campaign materials to help them reach different ethnic groups, age groups, and lifestyles. High profile support from sportspeople, celebrities, and politicians and media exposure are enjoyed by this campaign outfit.

This campaign team and outfit also work with national helplines, pharmacists, drop-in centers, and local stop smoking services. Evaluations are carried out on the No Smoking Day campaigns at the end of every year to ensure that the campaigns are up-to-date and relevant.                             According to Jonathan (2000), the No Smoking Day campaign can be seen to have used several theoretical models. Specifically, in the use of the media, celebrities, sportspersons, and political leaders, the use of social cognitive theory is immediately seen. Since the theory of planned behavior establishes the link between beliefs and behavior, it is readily seen in the No Smoking Day campaigns.

For instance, The No Smoking Day campaigns make it clear that it does not force smokers to quit smoking; harass smokers, or leave quitters high-and-dry and therefore this makes it clear that the campaign uses the theory of planned behavior. The crux of the matter herein is that the No Smoking Day campaign makes it plain that if people believe that its approaches are punitive, they will take on a defensive mode and eschew No Smoking Day campaigns.                       The No Smoking Day campaign clearly uses the radical humanist approach.

This is evidenced by the fact that it factors the holistic view of health matters. Particularly, the No Smoking Day campaign targets the smoker as a way of promoting public health and alleviating the dangers of passive smoking. The fact that the No Smoking Day campaign is centered on thousands of local organizers in the United Kingdom also underscores the use of the holistic model since this approach bespeaks the use of self-help networks as a means to an end.

  The Cervical Screening Awareness Week, 2014                       This is a UK-wide initiative which operates under the auspices of Jo’ s Cervical Cancer Trust. In its campaign week, the Cervical Screening Awareness Week emphasizes the importance of having cervical screening smears as a way of fighting cervical cancer. What informs the Cervical Screening Awareness Week campaigns is the fact that 22% of women in the UK still do not go for cervical screening. Cervical Screening Awareness Week campaign, therefore, seeks to raise public awareness on the threat, nature, and causes of cervical cancer (Cervical Cancer Prevention Week 19-25 January 2014).                       During the campaign week, Cervical Screening Awareness Week invites annual 5,000 sponsored walks-for-fun between 14 and 15 June, throughout the United Kingdom.

Volunteers are also allowed to use Cervical Screening Awareness Week’ s apps such as Twitter, Facebook, and MySpace to encourage friends, families, and members of the social circle to attend cervical screening. Those who actively participate in Cervical Screening Awareness Week campaigns are eligible for Cervical Screening Awards, after the completion of the walks-for-fun (Cooper, 2011).                       There are several theories and theoretical models that are used to facilitate health campaigns.

First, there is the use of the social cognitive theory, in having active members of the Cervical Screening Awareness Week’ s use apps such as Twitter, Facebook, and MySpace to encourage friends, families, and members of the social circle to attend cervical screening. This informs the Cervical Screening Awareness Week model which involves the use of community mobilization (Szarewski, 2011).                       A keen look at how the Cervical Screening Awareness Week’ s awareness campaign is managed and effected also reveals the use of the theory of behaviorism and model.

By making active and committed participants eligible for the Cervical Screening Awareness Week Award, this campaign outfit is cognizant of the reality of rewards (and punishment). The Stop AIDS Awareness                       The STOP AIDS Awareness campaigns are held on May 18 which also coincides with the HIV Vaccine Awareness Day (HVAD). In these campaigns, community members, volunteers, advocates, health professionals, scientists, and policymakers are drawn from their usual quest of finding the AIDS vaccine to participate in public campaigns.

In these campaigns, the importance of responsible sexual behavior such as abstinence, faithfulness to a spouse, and condom use is emphasized. Apart from the foregoing, the public is also informed on the progress that has been made towards the realization of an HIV AIDS vaccine.                       According to Tissingh (2009), The STOP AIDS Awareness campaigns are divided into homogenous groups. Every group is expected to have its time plan and to be selective so that concepts can be advanced or swiftly designated with clarity. The groups may voluntarily carry out AIDS awareness discussions, make voluntary HIV-AIDS tests, accord clients with counseling services (especially if a client tests positive for HIV virus), and divulge information on the need to know and accept one’ s status and on how to find healthcare and moral support.

Volunteers are accorded STOP AIDS Awareness Campaign Award after the completion of the HIV Vaccine Awareness Day.                       Careful consideration of the STOP AIDS Awareness Campaigns unveils the use of the transtheoretical model. The transtheoretical model of behavioral change factors and studies the readiness of an individual to act on a healthier behavior and also avail processes and strategies of positive change to guide the same individual through stages of change.

This is clearly depicted in the STOP AIDS Awareness Campaigns using educational and discussion approach as a way of inculcating positive behavioral change by following the ABCs (abstinence, being faithful to a spouse and condom use) of HIV-AIDS prevention. Considering How Successful the Programmes Are or Likely To Be and Evidence Supporting This                       No Smoking Day campaigns have always enjoyed success in its endeavors. There are several victory stories that vindicate the efforts that the No Smoking Day campaigns have made.

In 2013, the No Smoking Day campaigns had helped 100 people quit smoking. Many potential smokers have stayed away from smoking because of the No Smoking Day campaigns, though statistical provision on this fact is scanty since not so many have volunteered information on the same (Lewis, 2007).                         McCartney (2013) states that the Cervical Screening Awareness Week is also successful gong by statistical provisions. According to her, these campaigns have screened 2,000 women and thwarted the spread of cervical cancer through the detection and earlier treatment.                       According to UNAIDS (2007), STOP AIDS Awareness campaigns have also been successful.

The STOP AIDS Awareness campaigns have helped at least 5,000 people become aware of their HIV status and counseled 3,500 people. STOP AIDS Awareness campaigns have also reached 4,000 teenagers since 2007.

References

Cervical Cancer Prevention Week 19-25 January 2014. Podiatry Review, 71 (1), 13

Cooper, M. (2011). Reasons for non-attendance at cervical screening. Nursing standard (Royal College of Nursing (Great Britain): 1987), 25 (26), 41

Jonathan, F. (2000). The new NHS smoking campaign. British Medical Journal: International Edition, 320 (7232), 454

Lewis, E. (2007). Promoting the Health and Well-being of Young People in Supported Housing: A Practical Guide for Providers of Supported Housing and Health Services. London: National Children’s Bureau.

McCartney, M. (2013). The Patient Paradox. London: Pinter & Martin Ltd.

Szarewski, A. (2011). Social and psychological aspects of cervical screening. Expert Review of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 6 (1), 37 – 44

Tissingh, E. K. (2009). Medical education, global health and travel medicine: a modern student's experience. Travel medicine and infectious disease, 7 (1), 15 – 18

UNAIDS (2007). Global Reach: How Trade Unions Are Responding to AIDS: Case Studies of Union Action. WHO Publications.

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