Stress and the Neuroendocrine Response - Acute versus Chronic Stress – Neurology Example

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"Stress and the Neuroendocrine Response - Acute versus Chronic Stress"  is an engrossing example of a paper on neurology. Acute stress is a stress that occurs due to exposure to situations or events that are new and unpredictable. An example is a stress that occurs when one almost gets into a bicycle accident or when one is called forward to pray unexpectedly. Chronic stress is a kind of stress, which is a product of repeated exposure to situations or events. An example is a stress that occurs when one is staying with a battering partner or is looking for a job without success (Klein, 2013). Region of Brain that Detects and Interprets Stress The region of the brain that detects and interprets stress is the amygdala.

The function of the amygdala is to receive the potential stress call from the eye or ear, interpret the information received and sending a distress call to the hypothalamus in case of danger. The signal is in the distress format. The hypothalamus passes the information to the rest of the body through the ANS (Klein, 2013). Hormone The Hormone is a substance produced in the body that is chemical in nature with the role to control and maintain activities of given cells and/or organs.

The three major hormones involved in stress are adrenaline, cortisol, and norepinephrine. These hormones are released when the sympathetic nervous system sends information to the adrenal glands (Klein, 2013). HPA Hypothalamic- pituitary- adrenal axis is an organ that delivers adrenaline into the neurobiological system. HPA is an organ comprising of the hypothalamus, adrenal glands and pituitary gland (Klein, 2013). Recommendations to Counter Stress Stress cannot be controlled but can be managed.

Stress can be managed through the following actions: Accepting that some events are above our control. One should always have a positive attitude as opposed to a negative one. This will help reduce stress impacts. Interrupt stress. If one is overwhelmed should relax or take a walk. Avoid things that enhance stress. Time management is of importance. Make your schedule in a way that you have time to rest. One can engage in hobbies like reading or watching to deal with stress. Time should be set aside for activities like deep breathing and yoga. There is a need for regular exercise like jogging. Recreational drugs like alcohol should be avoided at all costs. One should eat a healthy and well-balanced diet. Look for social support.

References

Klein, S. Adrenaline, Cortisol and Norepinephrine: The three major stress hormones explained. Huffpost, 2013. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/19/adrenaline-cortisol-stress- hormones_n_3112800.html

Pearson Learning Solutions: Nervous System. Pearson Higher Education, 2014. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.pearsoncustom.com/mct-comprehensive/asset.php?isbn=1269879944&id=10030

Pearson Learning Solutions: The Animal Cell. Pearson Higher Education, 2014. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.pearsoncustom.com/mct- comprehensive/asset.php?isbn=1269879944&id=4589

Pearson Learning Solutions: Organization of Life. Pearson Higher Education, 2014. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.pearsoncustom.com/mct- comprehensive/asset.php?isbn=1269879944&id=4652

Pearson Learning Solutions: Introductory Anatomy and Physiology and Basic Chemistry. Pearson Higher Education, 2014. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.pearsoncustom.com/mct- comprehensive/asset.php?isbn=1269879944&id=8746

Stress Management Health Center: Tips for Reducing Stress. WebMD, 2014. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.webmd.com/balance/stress-management/reducing- stress-tips

Supplementary lesson: HPA Axis and Stress: Function, definition and quiz. Devine K, 2015. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/hpa-axis- and-stress-function-definition-quiz.html

Trusted Advice for a healthier life: Understanding the Stress Response. Harvard Health Publications, 2011. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/understanding-the-stress-response

Understand your stress: Acute vs. Chronic Stress. Centre for Studies on Human Stress (CSHS), 2015. Accessed on February 21, 2015, at http://www.humanstress.ca/stress/understand- your-stress/acute-vs-chronic-stress.html

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