Watsons Theory of Human Caring – Care Example

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"Watson’ s Theory of Human Caring" is a perfect example of a paper on care. Nursing care models encompass methods that determine the manner in which nursing care is conducted. Nursing care models, in this case, differ in varied health care institutions as well as in a set of different client situations. Given this, it is essential to note that nursing care models primarily provide a framework that helps in guiding education and practice. Of equal importance is the fact that nursing care models mainly provide infrastructures that are used in the rendering and organization of care to families and clients (Finkelman, 2016).

In this regard, this paper seeks to conduct a study with the intent of unraveling the manner in which nursing care models can be used in ensuring the delivery of health care, enhancing communication between the nursing practitioners, and bettering the professional status of the nursing practitioners in embracing education and research as observed in a health institution. Nursing Model Observed Watson’ s Theory of Human Caring While undertaking an assessment in one of the health facilities in my region, I came across a nurse who was assigned the responsibility of taking care of one of the patients who was brought in on that day and presented a history of diabetes mellitus, mainly considered as a hypersensitive and peripheral vascular disease.

The patient as observed during the moment was meant to undergo another amputation above his knee on the left leg given the fact that the last amputation he had undergone never healed sufficiently (Finkelman, 2016). I noticed the patient had a charismatic personality, an aspect that made it easier for the nurse providing care to engage him in a conversation to explain to him the procedures that he will go through and if he would give consent to begin the process of care. The nurse at this stage was in a position of applying Watson's theory of human caring in this situation, thus allowing her to develop an interpersonal and mutual relationship with the patient through communication.

The nurse enhanced communication with the patient, an aspect that allowed the patient to open up on his lifestyle, thus pointing out his belief and faith in regards to the approach of care (Gö nen Şentü rk, Kü ü ü kgü ü lü & Watson, 2017).

Through this, the nurse was in a position to devise proper measures that would be used in enhancing the process of care. The nurses, therefore, provided comfort and compassion to the patient during the process of care even when the patient showed instances of depression and fear in undergoing another amputation. Reviews on Watson’ s Theory of Human Caring Gö nen Şentü rk, Kü ü ü kgü ü lü & Watson (2017) alleges that nursing is mainly defined by the manner in which care is dispensed. Nurses in different healthcare institutions mainly embrace the theory of Jean Watson on human caring science in horning positive energies that emanate from an integrated body, spirit, and mind and that is considered as mutually rewarding for the nurses and the patients.

Designed through the vision developed by Florence Nightingale, the role of the nurse lies in ensuring that their patients are in a better position to heal by themselves, an aspect that optimally positions the nurses at the center of the healing process.   The nurses are in this case required to engage in the provision of care intentionally and through an authentic presence, thus helping in optimizing their patient’ s ability to develop a positive mentality that helps in the healing process. According to Ozan & Okumuş (2017), Watson primarily defines the therapeutic relationship between a nurse and a patient as one that is essential in enabling the caregivers to act ethically, professionally, and legally in ensuring that quality care is provided to the patients through a developed relationship between the two.

This, therefore, establishes that effective nursing to patient relationship remains fundamental in promoting and maintaining the recovery of the patients during the process of care.

The theory, in this case, establishes measures that nurses may use in maintaining emotional sensitivity as well as effective caring attitudes within a demanding and over-stressed work environment. Jean Watson, therefore, accentuates that the process of caring plays a vital role in the regeneration of life potentiates and energies. The end results of this are immeasurable and help in the promotion of self-actualization on a professional and a personal level. Caring, therefore, remains a mutual and beneficial experience for the nurses and their patients and between the team members in a health institution, thus supporting Watson's view that nurses need to care for themselves before caring for others.

On the other hand, the theory holds that self-healing remains necessary in rejuvenating the patient's and caregivers' energy reserves while equally replenishing their spiritual banks (Pajnkihar, McKenna, Š tiglic, & Vrbnjak, 2017).   Caring is a mutually beneficial experience for both the patient and the nurse, as well as between all health team members. In addition, it is important to remember that Watson emphasizes that we must care for ourselves to be able to care for others; self-healing is a necessary process for rejuvenating our energy reserves and replenishing our spiritual bank.   The Implementation of the Theory As evident in the case of the health facility observed, the implementation of this health theory remains an aspect that was achieved by educating the nurses on their roles in the delivery of care.

Given this, the theory played a vital role in guiding practice clinically, hedged on the belief that human caring remains a moral component of nursing.

In other words, the health facility inculcated a culture within the institution that helps the patients and their caregivers to freely relate in the process of care, an aspect that denoted the need for commitment, compassion, and empathy to enhance a wellness relationship (Pajnkihar et al. , 2017). One of the fundamental achievements in the implementation of this theory is evident in the manner in which the health facility protects, preserves, and enhances the worth and the dignity of their patients and nurses. Recommendation As an alternative to this model, the healthcare institution could have opted for the transcultural nursing model designed by Madeleine Leininger.

According to the theory, the primary objective and goal for nursing lie in the need to provide care that is congruent with the beliefs, cultural values, and practices of the patients (Pajnkihar et al. , 2017). In other words, the brainchild of this theory maintains that care remains the essence of the nursing process and the distinctive, dominant, and unifying factor, thus implying that patients cannot heal or get cured without nursing. In this regard, the health care professionals may need to have an understanding of the values, lifestyles, health beliefs, and cultures of their patients and the role of these factors in the delivery of care. Conclusion As established in this paper, nursing care models encompass methods that determine the manner in which nursing care is conducted.

Nursing care models, in this case, differ in varied health care institutions as well as in a set of different client situations. Nurses in different healthcare institutions mainly embrace the theory of Jean Watson on human caring science in horning positive energies that emanate from an integrated body, spirit, and mind and that is considered as mutually rewarding for the nurses and the patients.

Caring, therefore, remains a mutual and beneficial experience for the nurses and their patients and between the team members in a health institution, thus supporting Watson’ s view that nurses need to care for themselves before caring for others.    

References

Finkelman, A. (2016). Leadership and management for nurses: Core competencies for quality care (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

Gönen Şentürk, S., Küüükgüülü, Ö., & Watson, J. (2017). Caring For Caregivers of Individuals With Dementia: From the Perspective of Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Journal of Hacettepe University Faculty of Nursing, 4(1), 62–72.

Ozan, Y. D., & Okumuş, H. (2017). Effects of Nursing Care Based on Watson’s Theory of Human Caring on Anxiety, Distress, And Coping, When Infertility Treatment Fails: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Research & Development in Medical Education, 6(2), 95–109.

Pajnkihar, M., McKenna, H. P., Štiglic, G., & Vrbnjak, D. (2017). Fit for Practice: Analysis and Evaluation of Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. Nursing Science Quarterly, 30(3), 243–252.

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